The Steelcase Leap version 1 was released in 1999, which is now, over 18 years ago! My Steelcase V1 Chair I talked about in my Steelcase Leap Review was made in 2001.

Since I have both chairs, I thought I would do a comparison of the two chairs to help you see what has changed.

What is the Difference Between Steelcase Leap V1 and V2?


Steelcase Leap V1 vs. V2 Arms

What is the Difference Between Steelcase Leap V1 and V2?

V1

What is the Difference Between Steelcase Leap V1 and V2?

V2

One of the most notable improvements from the Steelcase Leap V1 going into the second version are the new arms. The old arms from the Steelcase V1 were OK  since they were super durable and fairly comfortable.

However, the new arms on the Steelcase Leap V2 are much better. Not only do they look better, but they also are made out of a plush squishy-like material that is very comfortable.

The arms are adjustable front and back whereas the old ones weren’t. This is HUGE For me since I like to use my arm rests more for my elbows than forearms. However, like the old arms, you can still swivel the arms back and forth side to side, and adjust them up and down.


Steelcase Leap V1 vs. V2 – Back

What is the Difference Between Steelcase Leap V1 and V2?

V2

What is the Difference Between Steelcase Leap V1 and V2?

V1

Another big change in the chairs is the back design. The first version of the chair didn’t have adjustable lumbar support, and the new one does. You just adjust it by moving two levers up and down. However, this sounds like a small change, when in fact, it is quite a big one.

The reason is that the whole back feels quite different, with much more lumbar support. The lumbar support is quite springy, and the chair almost feels like two parts–one part lumbar support, and the rest a flexible material for your upper back.

Changing from the Steelcase V1 to the V2 has been some adjustment, but a very good one. You can notice the difference in the two chairs designs since the V1’s back is much plusher and firm, whereas the new chair has more adjustability and flexibility without losing comfort.

Finally, the two back of the chairs looks a bit different as well. Due to the lumbar design, the V2 has a more curved back whereas the V1 version is more just like a backward “C” in design. I think both chairs look good, but the V2’s back is better looking regarding minimalism.


Steelcase Leap V1 vs. V2 – Seat Panel

What is the Difference Between Steelcase Leap V1 and V2?

V2

What is the Difference Between Steelcase Leap V1 and V2?

V1

The Steelcase Leap V1 and V2 have very similar seat panels. I don’t think too much has changed here, as both seat panels have an ergonomic shape for your legs and similar amounts of cushion. However, the V1 does have an adjustable lip to the seat panel, whereas the V2 has more flexibility in the lip not requiring adjustment. Overall, it’s not a huge change.


Steelcase Leap V1 vs. V2 – Adjustments

What is the Difference Between Steelcase Leap V1 and V2?

V2

What is the Difference Between Steelcase Leap V1 and V2?

V1

Both chairs have the same adjustments except for the adjustable lip. Both chairs have back tension adjustment, lower back firmness adjustment, adjustable arms (like I mentioned the V2 wins here, though), adjustable seat depth, and lockable tilt locations.

However, I do find that the Steelcase V2 has a bit more of a recline than the Steelcase V1 chair, and due to the natural glide system that moves the seat forward when you recline, it feels a bit smoother and more precise than the earlier version.


If you want to check out the Steelcase Leap V2 on Amazon, click this link. But if you want the Steelcase V1, you might have to find a used one locally at a warehouse reseller or from someone on craigslist.


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Looking to buy a good mattress to ease your back after gaming/working on the Steelcase Leap? Check out our best foam mattress guide to find the perfect mattress for your price/budget alongside your leap.

What is the Difference Between Steelcase Leap V1 and V2?

Tom Spark is a chair researcher, VPN expert, and a geek product extraordinaire. When he’s not spell checking his articles with Grammarly, he’s playing video games, watching too much Netflix, and deciding if he likes his current chair or not.

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