Good / The ProForm Pro 2000 is packed full of features. You’ll find a powerful 3.5 CHP motor, a 7” display, 12 MPH speed, 15% incline, iFit compatibility, and a steady cushioned deck. The ProForm Pro 2000 even comes with fans.
Bad / The ProForm Pro 2000 doesn’t mention Bluetooth compatibility, and there are some user reports of the product malfunctioning in some rare cases.
Verdict / If you can’t afford something like the Sole F80, but still want a good set of features, the ProForm Pro 2000 can give you most of what you would want from a premium treadmill.

ProForm Pro 2000 Treadmill Review

The ProForm Pro 2000 is one of the most popular treadmill products on Amazon that contains a decent amount of features and holds a real warranty. However, just because it’s not $200 or $300 like some treadmills on Amazon, and actually has a substantial price, doesn’t mean that it’s automatically a good or bad product.

Comparing the price, features, and longevity of this product in this ProForm Pro 2000 review will help you decide which treadmill you should get.

Price

The ProForm Pro 2000 goes for $1209 on Amazon. This is a decent price for a mid-grade treadmill. In this ProForm Pro 2000 review, we will look over if this price is worth it for what you get.

Features

ProForm Pro 2000 Treadmill Review

The ProForm Pro 2000 Treadmill comes equipped with a 3.5 CHP motor which is quite substantial for the price. While we’ve seen higher horsepower in some other models, these models are more expensive. 3.5 CHP is excellent.

It comes with a 7” display that is backlit. It’s not the best display by any means, but for the price, it is decent since it comes with 32 workout apps, is easy to read, and contains all of the necessary information you need.

The belt is a 20” x 60” 1-Ply commercial tread belt, and the running/walking area should be big enough for you to use comfortably.

Other cool features I like to see here are fans, iFit compatibility, and a 12 MPH speed limit. The treadmill also has a 15% tilt control, and a SpaceSaver design that lets you unfold and fold it up quickly. These are all features from premium reviewed treadmills, so it’s good to see them here at a lower price.

Longevity

ProForm Pro 2000 Treadmill Review

The ProForm Pro 2000 Treadmill comes with a lifetime warranty for its frame and motor and a 5-year warranty on the parts which is as good as we’ve seen. There is also a 2-year warranty on labor.

There are some users who have used this product who have experienced difficulty dealing with the company’s customer service, or malfunctioning parts, but there are always issues with popular products.

One reviewer had an issue with the display, but the company sent him a new one. In this case, the higher price should give you more confidence in the product since higher quality parts are used overall.

Unlike some of the cheaper products we’ve reviewed like the Weslo Cadence G 5.95 Treadmill, or the Confidence Power Plus Motorized Electric Treadmill where you can tell the treadmill won’t last that long due to a lack of features and quality parts, if you do have problems at least you are protected by a warranty that last years instead of months.

However, another one of our editors here has experience with this treadmill. He explains that it’s lasted over six years through wear and tear, even if the support has worn down. So this treadmill can last, and it’s a decent price packed full of features.

Conclusion

Overall, the ProForm Pro 2000 Treadmill is a decent folding treadmill product that has all of the most important features like a solid motor, good running experience with plenty of support, fans, and convenient iFit integrations.

However, there are some reports of quality control, but the lifetime warranty 5-year warranty on parts is solid. If you don’t want to risk any errors or mishaps, I’d recommend checking out something like the Sole F80 which is more reliable, powerful, and useful–and only a few more hundred dollars.

ProForm Pro 2000 Treadmill Review
Tom Spark is a chair researcher, VPN expert, and a geek product extraordinaire. When he’s not spell checking his articles with Grammarly, he’s playing video games, watching too much Netflix, and deciding if he likes his current chair or not.

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