The Good / The Alera Elusion Series Chair is a versatile budget ergonomic chair with a ton of adjustable features making it a good chair for a wide variety of body shapes and sizes. It also has a five-year warranty which means it’s durable.
The Bad / The Alera chair’s armrests can’t move side to side, and the chair lacks meaningful lumbar support.
The Verdict / If you want a cheap ergonomic chair, this is THE ONE to get. However, I still would recommend an expensive ergonomic chair like the Steelcase Leap for 8+ hour work days. Also, the HON Basyx chair has better adjustable arms. 

Alera Elusion Series Chair Review


Alera Chair Review Intro

The Alera chair is a well-received budget ergonomic chair on Amazon that people compare to the Herman Miller Aeron.

While it certainly does not hold the same type of build quality and ten-year warranty, the chair does present itself as an interesting lower-priced alternative with similar adjustments.

In this Alera Elusion Series chair review, I’ll take a look at what ergonomic functions and comfort the chair offers.


Pricing

Probably the best thing about the Alera Elusion Series chair is the price.

Price is an important factor when people buy chairs, and since the Alera Elusion Series chair is only $155 on Amazon, it can be an attractive purchase. The chair has a wide range of adjustments for the price and a five-year warranty, so it does seem to be a decent deal.


Comfort / Features

Alera Elusion Series Chair Review

The Alera Elusion Series chair comes in two models, the mid-back model and the high-back model. I think purchasing the high-back model could be good if you’re taller or like higher backs, whereas the mid-back model should be fine too. In addition, if you are “petite” there is even a “Petite Model”.

Overall, though, the chair should be a good fit for most people in the standard model since the chair does have a wide range of adjustments to configure. It might be intimidating at first, but once you understand what the various levers do, it’s easy to get it “just right.”

The Alera chair features a seat glide function which lets you adjust the seat to the right length for your legs. In addition, the chair also has softer foam near the edge, so it doesn’t dig into your legs, and this is called a “waterfall edge.” The seat on the Alera is quite good and contains a good amount of padding. The seat even contains some contour.

Alera Elusion Series Chair Review

Other features include an adjustable tilt with locked positions or free float, adjustable height and arms, and casters that let you move around.

The tilt functions of the chair seem quite good, and I like how the chair does let you lean back individually from the seat panel (most chairs incline the seat with you which makes your legs too high). Height adjustment feels standard, but some users complain that the regular sized model doesn’t go low enough for shorter users.

The arms are nothing special since they can only go up and down. Not many chairs in this price range do anything else, however. Some chairs like the slightly more expensive HON Basyx Chair, do, though.

Some users complain that the back lacks significant lumbar support, but the design is ergonomic and supported well by the frame.


Alera Chair Review Conclusion

Overall, the Alera Chair is quite a bargain for the adjustability that it presents. It has a good ergonomic design, and good comfort level for the price, and I’m not surprised if others out there compare this chair to the Aeron.

However, just because the chair contains similar adjustments, doesn’t mean the chairs back support or seat padding can compare to the Aeron. If you’re limited on budget, however, and want a chair to sit in a few hours a day, this is a good choice.  

However, if you’re an 8+ hour work at the computer sort of guy/gal, I’d recommend a real ergonomic chair like the Steelcase Leap (Steelcase Leap Review) or the Herman Miller Aeron (Herman Miller Aeron Review).

Alera Elusion Series Chair Review

Tom Spark is a chair researcher, VPN expert, and a geek product extraordinaire. When he’s not spell checking his articles with Grammarly, he’s playing video games, watching too much Netflix, and deciding if he likes his current chair or not.

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